First transgender graduate in Pass Christian School awarded a full scholarship

Jorden Blosser, photo from sunherald.com.
  • Jorden Blosser would be one of the first transgender graduates from Pass Christian High School in Mississippi.
  • Finishing high school with a 3.5 GPA, she had earned a full scholarship at Berea College in Kentucky.
  • Blosser made a name for himself for his involvement in activism and academics, earning respect and support from his peers, teachers, and family.

Jorden Blosser, a transgender boy, is set to graduate from Pass Christian School in Mississippi and would go to college with a full scholarship.

According to the transgender news article by WLOX website on May 7, Blosser made a name for himself for his involvement in activism and academics, earning respect and support from his peers, teachers, and family.

First transgender graduate

Blosser would be one of the first transgender graduates from Pass Christian High School and his graduation was a joy to experience as he was able to to live his life authentically.

Finishing high school with a 3.5 GPA, she had earned a full scholarship at Berea College in Kentucky.  He was especially proud of his class ring, which he requested before he told his parents his plans to transition from girl to boy.

“It kind of signifies my transition to me because it’s a male ring but it has my birth initials on it. It’s engraved with my birth name,” he shared. “I do love my school, and I knew if I got the ring that everybody was expecting me to get, I would never wear it.”  Known previously with her birth name EmmaLee, Blosser knew early on that he was different.

“It never occurred to me that I was a girl. I was just me,” he said. “It was eighth grade when I realized that things were matching up, and ninth grade when I finally had a name for that.”  

He also said in an interview that he disliked looking at pictures of himself when he was younger.  “I hated the way I looked in pictures,” he said looking through pictures of him in his younger years. “I hated the way I looked in tight clothes. I hated the way I looked in general. I’m pretty sure you can figure that out by the way I’m looking at the camera.”

Family support

As a sophomore, he came out to his family.

“I feel incredibly lucky and I almost cried when I finally realized that they had accepted me and that I did have support,” he recalled.

His mother, Suzi, initially thought what her son was going through was a phase.

“I would love to say I embraced it. That I was completely accepting,” she stated. “But that is not what happened. I thought it was a phase.”

She was also worried that her son may not make it in high school.

“I honestly didn’t think that he was going to make it through high school,” she said. “I was worried that he wasn’t going to survive it.”

A month after he came out, Blossen changed his name. He said he was glad that a friend called him by his preferred name.

“It just kind of blew my mind for a second, that I wasn’t alone, and that people understood me and recognized for who I am,” he expressed. Soon, his grades went up and he started coming up with plans for his future.

“He did all that. He transitioned. He brought his GPA up,” his mother remarked. “I didn’t do that. That was him. How can I not be proud of him?”

Via

About Maki 212 Articles
Trans advocate, beauty queen, model, runner. Marketing director of myladyboydate.com and mytranssexualdate.com.

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