Transgender victims to be remembered during Transgender Day of Remembrance

Transgender Day of Remembrance, photo from commondreams.org
  • Advocates will hold vigils in the state in North Carolina for Transgender Day of Remembrance.
  • They voice concerns on escalating violence targeting transgender individuals, especially trans individuals of color.
  • Transgender Day of Remembrance is marked internationally as a day dedicated to remembering transgender individuals killed for the past year.

LGBT advocates is going hold a vigil to remember transgender victims who are killed as a result of violence for the past year in North Carolina.

According to The News & Observer, the vigil will be held at the North Carolina State Capitol in the evening to remember the record-high number of transgender victims killed in 2017.

In a transgender related news, groups have estimated that at least 25 transgender people were killed In the U.S. this year, including the first transgender killing in Mississippi. Most of the victims were transgender individuals of color.

Last year, there were 23 recorded killings of transgender people.

Worldwide, the International Trans Day of Remembrance (TDoR) 2017 update revealed there were 2,609 reported cases of transgender kills in 71 countries between 1st of January 2008 and 30th of September 2017.

From 1st of October 2016 and 30th of September this year, there are 325 cases of reported killings of transgender and gender-nonconforming people – an increase of 30 cases compared to last year’s update. Brazil was first on the list with 171 murders, followed by Mexico and United States.

The increasing level of violence against transgender people worried advocates. Kelly Taylor, assistant director of the LGBT Center of Raleigh, said, “People are being murdered for who they are… The violence seems to be increasing.”

The LGBT Center of Raleigh is the sponsoring organization of the vigil, one of the 11 similar planned events across the state to mark the Transgender Day of Remembrance, a tradition held in many countries that started in 1999.

The vigil comes at a time when LGBT rights have attracted national attention. North Carolina for instance has repealed House Bill 2, also known as Bathroom Bill, which would have prohibited transgender people the choice of the gendered bathroom they identify with, as well as the transgender military ban by President Donald Trump which is currently suspended by a federal court.

Advocates point out how difficult it is to count how often transgender people are targeted for attacks in North Carolina based on their gender identity.

According to the Human Rig Transgender victims to be remembered during Transgender Day of Remembrance

Advocates will hold vigils in the state in North Carolina for Transgender Day of Remembrance.
They voice concerns on escalating violence targeting transgender individuals, especially trans individuals of color.
Transgender Day of Remembrance is marked internationally as a day dedicated to remembering transgender individuals killed for the past year.

LGBT advocates is going hold a vigil to remember transgender victims who are killed as a result of violence for the past year in North Carolina.

According to The News & Observer, the vigil will be held at the North Carolina State Capitol in the evening to remember the record-high number of transgender victims killed in 2017.

In a transgender related news, groups have estimated that at least 25 transgender people were killed In the U.S. this year, including the first transgender killing in Mississippi. Most of the victims were transgender individuals of color.

Last year, there were 23 recorded killings of transgender people.

Worldwide, the International Trans Day of Remembrance (TDoR) 2017 update revealed there were 2,609 reported cases of transgender kills in 71 countries between 1st of January 2008 and 30th of September 2017.

From 1st of October 2016 and 30th of September this year, there are 325 cases of reported killings of transgender and gender-nonconforming people – an increase of 30 cases compared to last year’s update. Brazil was first on the list with 171 murders, followed by Mexico and United States.

The increasing level of violence against transgender people worried advocates. Kelly Taylor, assistant director of the LGBT Center of Raleigh, said, “People are being murdered for who they are… The violence seems to be increasing.”

The LGBT Center of Raleigh is the sponsoring organization of the vigil, one of the 11 similar planned events across the state to mark the Transgender Day of Remembrance, a tradition held in many countries that started in 1999.

The vigil comes at a time when LGBT rights have attracted national attention. North Carolina for instance has repealed House Bill 2, also known as Bathroom Bill, which would have prohibited transgender people the choice of the gendered bathroom they identify with, as well as the transgender military ban by President Donald Trump which is currently suspended by a federal court.

Advocates point out how difficult it is to count how often transgender people are targeted for attacks in North Carolina based on their gender identity.

According to the Human Rights Campaign, while there are cases with clear anti-transgender bias, others involve circumstances that push victims to be exposed to elevated risks such as being kicked out of their home and on the streets.

The Human Rights Campaign on their website wrote, “While the details of these cases differ, it is clear that fatal violence disproportionately affects transgender women of color, and that the intersections of racism, sexism, homophobia and transphobia conspire to deprive them of employment, housing, healthcare and other necessities, barriers that make them vulnerable.”

The vigils will conclude the Transgender Awareness week, an event that was established with the goal of raising visibility of transgender people and the issues that they face. hts Campaign, while there are cases with clear anti-transgender bias, others involve circumstances that push victims to be exposed to elevated risks such as being kicked out of their home and on the streets.

The Human Rights Campaign on their website wrote, “While the details of these cases differ, it is clear that fatal violence disproportionately affects transgender women of color, and that the intersections of racism, sexism, homophobia and transphobia conspire to deprive them of employment, housing, healthcare and other necessities, barriers that make them vulnerable.”

The vigils will conclude the Transgender Awareness week, an event that was established with the goal of raising visibility of transgender people and the issues that they face.

Via

About Maki 212 Articles
Trans advocate, beauty queen, model, runner. Marketing director of myladyboydate.com and mytranssexualdate.com.

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